i see a lion in the mirror when i look💰🚬
The name's Gi. This blog is dedicated to the amazing Mac Miller. SMOKE WEED, EAT YOGURT.
i see a lion in the mirror when i look💰🚬
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kissingcullens:

dendritic-trees:

derevko:

last-snowfall:

Steve name me one time between Basic and going into the ice that you actually followed orders. ONE. TIME.



I have feelings about this.  I’m supposed to be doing work, but its hard, so I’m gonna explain them instead.  Right from the start of CA:TFA we see that Steve really specifically wants to be a soldier.  He knows there’s all sorts of various ways to support the war effort, but not, specifically he wants to fight on the front lines.  
But Steve is never a particularly good soldier, in fact, he very specifically isn’t a good soldier.  Steve is a good man not a perfect soldier.  Steve NEVER has any success when he tries his hand at being a regular soldier, or even a supersoldier.  In CA:TFA he ends up working with the Howling Commandos, almost entirely outside of the regular military structure and that’s when he manages all the serious heroics and really lives up to his potential.  In Avengers at the beginning he tries to be a good soldier for a while and tries to follow Fury’s orders, but for the first half of the movie Steve is lost and miserable and visibly hiding behind his USO Tour “Captain America” persona.  But its only when he goes off on his own, breaks into store rooms and steals Fury’s proto-type tesseract weapons, that he really gets anything done (before that he gets batted about by Loki and sort of wanders about at loose ends), and he doesn’t really get back into a leadership role and really become actual Captain America again, until he steals a quinn jet with Natasha and Clint.
And despite that, in CA:WS he’s back at Shield, trying to be ‘the greatest soldier in history’ and ‘follow orders’, and… not doing that at all…
So where does Steve’s abortive fascination with being a good soldier come from?
Partly I think its an expression of his very obvious depression.  I’ve seen about umpteen criticisms of Steve’s ‘we have our orders’ line to Tony in Avengers but I think that the fact its out of character is the point.  Steve is miserable, and lost, he doesn’t know what makes him happy, he doesn’t know what he wants to do with himself so he follows Nick Fury’s orders, because he has given up.  
But also I think that even though Steve doesn’t really want to be the sort of person who follows orders, he to a certain extent wants to want it, sort of as the equivalent of a very bright girl who plays dumb in class because she’s been told no one likes smart girls.  The good soldier is very much the model of ideal masculine success that Steve would have grown up with but wouldn’t have ever been able to achieve   
Which is ironic given that the ideal male icon most of the cast of the Avengers probably grew up with… is Captain America.

The thing I get from this scene is that Steve DOES crave to serve and take orders in a way? Like he doesn’t want to be a drone and take orders/be obedient in the literal sense (or else he would have been happy just being in the USO and raising money, or being a regular GI) he’s got a strong rebellious streak, natural snark, and unshakeable morals…but how I read Steve’s character is that he’s desperate for a cause, but it has to be something full of glorious purpose and heroism.  Not for Steve, collecting scrap metal or hocking war bonds for “the cause.”He wants to be pointed in the right direction and then just fucking RUN with it.  “Highly experimental super-serum? LET ME AT IT.”If you’ve ever read Middlemarch? Steve reminds me a lot of Dorothea: eager to throw their all into something, really yearning to sacrifice everything for the greater good, and their longing to be a hero comes out of goodness and love, but they do fall victim to pride and haughtiness because he gets impatient when things aren’t big and important—- They think that if a cause was righteous enough that they would love to dedicate themselves thanklessly to it and work uncomplainingly towards that goal.  But they’re too headstrong and spirited to actually just take orders and work for someone else when it comes down to that: the reality is different than they expect, and they become disillusioned but no less idealistic and passionate and their thirst for glory is just as strong as their thirst to do good in the world.So idk if this even makes that much sense, but I’ve thought about this a lot actually haha—for me, Steve’s main motivation isn’t trying to fill a masculine soldier role that doesn’t fit him(although his conception of soldier=hero is def a cultural/gender role type thing) ….but more that he WAS happy and fulfilled for a brief moment with the Howling Commandos (and with the Avengers once he’d gotten behind the mission) because he had a definite cause and definite orders that he could follow—- and now he feels adrift.  So his line to Natasha about how he “likes to know who he’s fighting” is related to this: he’s a smart guy, he understands grey, but he likes black and white.  In his mind, especially (as you point out) because of his depression and loneliness, he does want, above all, to take orders, just so things make some kind of sense again…
kissingcullens:

dendritic-trees:

derevko:

last-snowfall:

Steve name me one time between Basic and going into the ice that you actually followed orders. ONE. TIME.



I have feelings about this.  I’m supposed to be doing work, but its hard, so I’m gonna explain them instead.  Right from the start of CA:TFA we see that Steve really specifically wants to be a soldier.  He knows there’s all sorts of various ways to support the war effort, but not, specifically he wants to fight on the front lines.  
But Steve is never a particularly good soldier, in fact, he very specifically isn’t a good soldier.  Steve is a good man not a perfect soldier.  Steve NEVER has any success when he tries his hand at being a regular soldier, or even a supersoldier.  In CA:TFA he ends up working with the Howling Commandos, almost entirely outside of the regular military structure and that’s when he manages all the serious heroics and really lives up to his potential.  In Avengers at the beginning he tries to be a good soldier for a while and tries to follow Fury’s orders, but for the first half of the movie Steve is lost and miserable and visibly hiding behind his USO Tour “Captain America” persona.  But its only when he goes off on his own, breaks into store rooms and steals Fury’s proto-type tesseract weapons, that he really gets anything done (before that he gets batted about by Loki and sort of wanders about at loose ends), and he doesn’t really get back into a leadership role and really become actual Captain America again, until he steals a quinn jet with Natasha and Clint.
And despite that, in CA:WS he’s back at Shield, trying to be ‘the greatest soldier in history’ and ‘follow orders’, and… not doing that at all…
So where does Steve’s abortive fascination with being a good soldier come from?
Partly I think its an expression of his very obvious depression.  I’ve seen about umpteen criticisms of Steve’s ‘we have our orders’ line to Tony in Avengers but I think that the fact its out of character is the point.  Steve is miserable, and lost, he doesn’t know what makes him happy, he doesn’t know what he wants to do with himself so he follows Nick Fury’s orders, because he has given up.  
But also I think that even though Steve doesn’t really want to be the sort of person who follows orders, he to a certain extent wants to want it, sort of as the equivalent of a very bright girl who plays dumb in class because she’s been told no one likes smart girls.  The good soldier is very much the model of ideal masculine success that Steve would have grown up with but wouldn’t have ever been able to achieve   
Which is ironic given that the ideal male icon most of the cast of the Avengers probably grew up with… is Captain America.

The thing I get from this scene is that Steve DOES crave to serve and take orders in a way? Like he doesn’t want to be a drone and take orders/be obedient in the literal sense (or else he would have been happy just being in the USO and raising money, or being a regular GI) he’s got a strong rebellious streak, natural snark, and unshakeable morals…but how I read Steve’s character is that he’s desperate for a cause, but it has to be something full of glorious purpose and heroism.  Not for Steve, collecting scrap metal or hocking war bonds for “the cause.”He wants to be pointed in the right direction and then just fucking RUN with it.  “Highly experimental super-serum? LET ME AT IT.”If you’ve ever read Middlemarch? Steve reminds me a lot of Dorothea: eager to throw their all into something, really yearning to sacrifice everything for the greater good, and their longing to be a hero comes out of goodness and love, but they do fall victim to pride and haughtiness because he gets impatient when things aren’t big and important—- They think that if a cause was righteous enough that they would love to dedicate themselves thanklessly to it and work uncomplainingly towards that goal.  But they’re too headstrong and spirited to actually just take orders and work for someone else when it comes down to that: the reality is different than they expect, and they become disillusioned but no less idealistic and passionate and their thirst for glory is just as strong as their thirst to do good in the world.So idk if this even makes that much sense, but I’ve thought about this a lot actually haha—for me, Steve’s main motivation isn’t trying to fill a masculine soldier role that doesn’t fit him(although his conception of soldier=hero is def a cultural/gender role type thing) ….but more that he WAS happy and fulfilled for a brief moment with the Howling Commandos (and with the Avengers once he’d gotten behind the mission) because he had a definite cause and definite orders that he could follow—- and now he feels adrift.  So his line to Natasha about how he “likes to know who he’s fighting” is related to this: he’s a smart guy, he understands grey, but he likes black and white.  In his mind, especially (as you point out) because of his depression and loneliness, he does want, above all, to take orders, just so things make some kind of sense again…
kissingcullens:

dendritic-trees:

derevko:

last-snowfall:

Steve name me one time between Basic and going into the ice that you actually followed orders. ONE. TIME.



I have feelings about this.  I’m supposed to be doing work, but its hard, so I’m gonna explain them instead.  Right from the start of CA:TFA we see that Steve really specifically wants to be a soldier.  He knows there’s all sorts of various ways to support the war effort, but not, specifically he wants to fight on the front lines.  
But Steve is never a particularly good soldier, in fact, he very specifically isn’t a good soldier.  Steve is a good man not a perfect soldier.  Steve NEVER has any success when he tries his hand at being a regular soldier, or even a supersoldier.  In CA:TFA he ends up working with the Howling Commandos, almost entirely outside of the regular military structure and that’s when he manages all the serious heroics and really lives up to his potential.  In Avengers at the beginning he tries to be a good soldier for a while and tries to follow Fury’s orders, but for the first half of the movie Steve is lost and miserable and visibly hiding behind his USO Tour “Captain America” persona.  But its only when he goes off on his own, breaks into store rooms and steals Fury’s proto-type tesseract weapons, that he really gets anything done (before that he gets batted about by Loki and sort of wanders about at loose ends), and he doesn’t really get back into a leadership role and really become actual Captain America again, until he steals a quinn jet with Natasha and Clint.
And despite that, in CA:WS he’s back at Shield, trying to be ‘the greatest soldier in history’ and ‘follow orders’, and… not doing that at all…
So where does Steve’s abortive fascination with being a good soldier come from?
Partly I think its an expression of his very obvious depression.  I’ve seen about umpteen criticisms of Steve’s ‘we have our orders’ line to Tony in Avengers but I think that the fact its out of character is the point.  Steve is miserable, and lost, he doesn’t know what makes him happy, he doesn’t know what he wants to do with himself so he follows Nick Fury’s orders, because he has given up.  
But also I think that even though Steve doesn’t really want to be the sort of person who follows orders, he to a certain extent wants to want it, sort of as the equivalent of a very bright girl who plays dumb in class because she’s been told no one likes smart girls.  The good soldier is very much the model of ideal masculine success that Steve would have grown up with but wouldn’t have ever been able to achieve   
Which is ironic given that the ideal male icon most of the cast of the Avengers probably grew up with… is Captain America.

The thing I get from this scene is that Steve DOES crave to serve and take orders in a way? Like he doesn’t want to be a drone and take orders/be obedient in the literal sense (or else he would have been happy just being in the USO and raising money, or being a regular GI) he’s got a strong rebellious streak, natural snark, and unshakeable morals…but how I read Steve’s character is that he’s desperate for a cause, but it has to be something full of glorious purpose and heroism.  Not for Steve, collecting scrap metal or hocking war bonds for “the cause.”He wants to be pointed in the right direction and then just fucking RUN with it.  “Highly experimental super-serum? LET ME AT IT.”If you’ve ever read Middlemarch? Steve reminds me a lot of Dorothea: eager to throw their all into something, really yearning to sacrifice everything for the greater good, and their longing to be a hero comes out of goodness and love, but they do fall victim to pride and haughtiness because he gets impatient when things aren’t big and important—- They think that if a cause was righteous enough that they would love to dedicate themselves thanklessly to it and work uncomplainingly towards that goal.  But they’re too headstrong and spirited to actually just take orders and work for someone else when it comes down to that: the reality is different than they expect, and they become disillusioned but no less idealistic and passionate and their thirst for glory is just as strong as their thirst to do good in the world.So idk if this even makes that much sense, but I’ve thought about this a lot actually haha—for me, Steve’s main motivation isn’t trying to fill a masculine soldier role that doesn’t fit him(although his conception of soldier=hero is def a cultural/gender role type thing) ….but more that he WAS happy and fulfilled for a brief moment with the Howling Commandos (and with the Avengers once he’d gotten behind the mission) because he had a definite cause and definite orders that he could follow—- and now he feels adrift.  So his line to Natasha about how he “likes to know who he’s fighting” is related to this: he’s a smart guy, he understands grey, but he likes black and white.  In his mind, especially (as you point out) because of his depression and loneliness, he does want, above all, to take orders, just so things make some kind of sense again…
kissingcullens:

dendritic-trees:

derevko:

last-snowfall:

Steve name me one time between Basic and going into the ice that you actually followed orders. ONE. TIME.



I have feelings about this.  I’m supposed to be doing work, but its hard, so I’m gonna explain them instead.  Right from the start of CA:TFA we see that Steve really specifically wants to be a soldier.  He knows there’s all sorts of various ways to support the war effort, but not, specifically he wants to fight on the front lines.  
But Steve is never a particularly good soldier, in fact, he very specifically isn’t a good soldier.  Steve is a good man not a perfect soldier.  Steve NEVER has any success when he tries his hand at being a regular soldier, or even a supersoldier.  In CA:TFA he ends up working with the Howling Commandos, almost entirely outside of the regular military structure and that’s when he manages all the serious heroics and really lives up to his potential.  In Avengers at the beginning he tries to be a good soldier for a while and tries to follow Fury’s orders, but for the first half of the movie Steve is lost and miserable and visibly hiding behind his USO Tour “Captain America” persona.  But its only when he goes off on his own, breaks into store rooms and steals Fury’s proto-type tesseract weapons, that he really gets anything done (before that he gets batted about by Loki and sort of wanders about at loose ends), and he doesn’t really get back into a leadership role and really become actual Captain America again, until he steals a quinn jet with Natasha and Clint.
And despite that, in CA:WS he’s back at Shield, trying to be ‘the greatest soldier in history’ and ‘follow orders’, and… not doing that at all…
So where does Steve’s abortive fascination with being a good soldier come from?
Partly I think its an expression of his very obvious depression.  I’ve seen about umpteen criticisms of Steve’s ‘we have our orders’ line to Tony in Avengers but I think that the fact its out of character is the point.  Steve is miserable, and lost, he doesn’t know what makes him happy, he doesn’t know what he wants to do with himself so he follows Nick Fury’s orders, because he has given up.  
But also I think that even though Steve doesn’t really want to be the sort of person who follows orders, he to a certain extent wants to want it, sort of as the equivalent of a very bright girl who plays dumb in class because she’s been told no one likes smart girls.  The good soldier is very much the model of ideal masculine success that Steve would have grown up with but wouldn’t have ever been able to achieve   
Which is ironic given that the ideal male icon most of the cast of the Avengers probably grew up with… is Captain America.

The thing I get from this scene is that Steve DOES crave to serve and take orders in a way? Like he doesn’t want to be a drone and take orders/be obedient in the literal sense (or else he would have been happy just being in the USO and raising money, or being a regular GI) he’s got a strong rebellious streak, natural snark, and unshakeable morals…but how I read Steve’s character is that he’s desperate for a cause, but it has to be something full of glorious purpose and heroism.  Not for Steve, collecting scrap metal or hocking war bonds for “the cause.”He wants to be pointed in the right direction and then just fucking RUN with it.  “Highly experimental super-serum? LET ME AT IT.”If you’ve ever read Middlemarch? Steve reminds me a lot of Dorothea: eager to throw their all into something, really yearning to sacrifice everything for the greater good, and their longing to be a hero comes out of goodness and love, but they do fall victim to pride and haughtiness because he gets impatient when things aren’t big and important—- They think that if a cause was righteous enough that they would love to dedicate themselves thanklessly to it and work uncomplainingly towards that goal.  But they’re too headstrong and spirited to actually just take orders and work for someone else when it comes down to that: the reality is different than they expect, and they become disillusioned but no less idealistic and passionate and their thirst for glory is just as strong as their thirst to do good in the world.So idk if this even makes that much sense, but I’ve thought about this a lot actually haha—for me, Steve’s main motivation isn’t trying to fill a masculine soldier role that doesn’t fit him(although his conception of soldier=hero is def a cultural/gender role type thing) ….but more that he WAS happy and fulfilled for a brief moment with the Howling Commandos (and with the Avengers once he’d gotten behind the mission) because he had a definite cause and definite orders that he could follow—- and now he feels adrift.  So his line to Natasha about how he “likes to know who he’s fighting” is related to this: he’s a smart guy, he understands grey, but he likes black and white.  In his mind, especially (as you point out) because of his depression and loneliness, he does want, above all, to take orders, just so things make some kind of sense again…
kissingcullens:

dendritic-trees:

derevko:

last-snowfall:

Steve name me one time between Basic and going into the ice that you actually followed orders. ONE. TIME.



I have feelings about this.  I’m supposed to be doing work, but its hard, so I’m gonna explain them instead.  Right from the start of CA:TFA we see that Steve really specifically wants to be a soldier.  He knows there’s all sorts of various ways to support the war effort, but not, specifically he wants to fight on the front lines.  
But Steve is never a particularly good soldier, in fact, he very specifically isn’t a good soldier.  Steve is a good man not a perfect soldier.  Steve NEVER has any success when he tries his hand at being a regular soldier, or even a supersoldier.  In CA:TFA he ends up working with the Howling Commandos, almost entirely outside of the regular military structure and that’s when he manages all the serious heroics and really lives up to his potential.  In Avengers at the beginning he tries to be a good soldier for a while and tries to follow Fury’s orders, but for the first half of the movie Steve is lost and miserable and visibly hiding behind his USO Tour “Captain America” persona.  But its only when he goes off on his own, breaks into store rooms and steals Fury’s proto-type tesseract weapons, that he really gets anything done (before that he gets batted about by Loki and sort of wanders about at loose ends), and he doesn’t really get back into a leadership role and really become actual Captain America again, until he steals a quinn jet with Natasha and Clint.
And despite that, in CA:WS he’s back at Shield, trying to be ‘the greatest soldier in history’ and ‘follow orders’, and… not doing that at all…
So where does Steve’s abortive fascination with being a good soldier come from?
Partly I think its an expression of his very obvious depression.  I’ve seen about umpteen criticisms of Steve’s ‘we have our orders’ line to Tony in Avengers but I think that the fact its out of character is the point.  Steve is miserable, and lost, he doesn’t know what makes him happy, he doesn’t know what he wants to do with himself so he follows Nick Fury’s orders, because he has given up.  
But also I think that even though Steve doesn’t really want to be the sort of person who follows orders, he to a certain extent wants to want it, sort of as the equivalent of a very bright girl who plays dumb in class because she’s been told no one likes smart girls.  The good soldier is very much the model of ideal masculine success that Steve would have grown up with but wouldn’t have ever been able to achieve   
Which is ironic given that the ideal male icon most of the cast of the Avengers probably grew up with… is Captain America.

The thing I get from this scene is that Steve DOES crave to serve and take orders in a way? Like he doesn’t want to be a drone and take orders/be obedient in the literal sense (or else he would have been happy just being in the USO and raising money, or being a regular GI) he’s got a strong rebellious streak, natural snark, and unshakeable morals…but how I read Steve’s character is that he’s desperate for a cause, but it has to be something full of glorious purpose and heroism.  Not for Steve, collecting scrap metal or hocking war bonds for “the cause.”He wants to be pointed in the right direction and then just fucking RUN with it.  “Highly experimental super-serum? LET ME AT IT.”If you’ve ever read Middlemarch? Steve reminds me a lot of Dorothea: eager to throw their all into something, really yearning to sacrifice everything for the greater good, and their longing to be a hero comes out of goodness and love, but they do fall victim to pride and haughtiness because he gets impatient when things aren’t big and important—- They think that if a cause was righteous enough that they would love to dedicate themselves thanklessly to it and work uncomplainingly towards that goal.  But they’re too headstrong and spirited to actually just take orders and work for someone else when it comes down to that: the reality is different than they expect, and they become disillusioned but no less idealistic and passionate and their thirst for glory is just as strong as their thirst to do good in the world.So idk if this even makes that much sense, but I’ve thought about this a lot actually haha—for me, Steve’s main motivation isn’t trying to fill a masculine soldier role that doesn’t fit him(although his conception of soldier=hero is def a cultural/gender role type thing) ….but more that he WAS happy and fulfilled for a brief moment with the Howling Commandos (and with the Avengers once he’d gotten behind the mission) because he had a definite cause and definite orders that he could follow—- and now he feels adrift.  So his line to Natasha about how he “likes to know who he’s fighting” is related to this: he’s a smart guy, he understands grey, but he likes black and white.  In his mind, especially (as you point out) because of his depression and loneliness, he does want, above all, to take orders, just so things make some kind of sense again…
kissingcullens:

dendritic-trees:

derevko:

last-snowfall:

Steve name me one time between Basic and going into the ice that you actually followed orders. ONE. TIME.



I have feelings about this.  I’m supposed to be doing work, but its hard, so I’m gonna explain them instead.  Right from the start of CA:TFA we see that Steve really specifically wants to be a soldier.  He knows there’s all sorts of various ways to support the war effort, but not, specifically he wants to fight on the front lines.  
But Steve is never a particularly good soldier, in fact, he very specifically isn’t a good soldier.  Steve is a good man not a perfect soldier.  Steve NEVER has any success when he tries his hand at being a regular soldier, or even a supersoldier.  In CA:TFA he ends up working with the Howling Commandos, almost entirely outside of the regular military structure and that’s when he manages all the serious heroics and really lives up to his potential.  In Avengers at the beginning he tries to be a good soldier for a while and tries to follow Fury’s orders, but for the first half of the movie Steve is lost and miserable and visibly hiding behind his USO Tour “Captain America” persona.  But its only when he goes off on his own, breaks into store rooms and steals Fury’s proto-type tesseract weapons, that he really gets anything done (before that he gets batted about by Loki and sort of wanders about at loose ends), and he doesn’t really get back into a leadership role and really become actual Captain America again, until he steals a quinn jet with Natasha and Clint.
And despite that, in CA:WS he’s back at Shield, trying to be ‘the greatest soldier in history’ and ‘follow orders’, and… not doing that at all…
So where does Steve’s abortive fascination with being a good soldier come from?
Partly I think its an expression of his very obvious depression.  I’ve seen about umpteen criticisms of Steve’s ‘we have our orders’ line to Tony in Avengers but I think that the fact its out of character is the point.  Steve is miserable, and lost, he doesn’t know what makes him happy, he doesn’t know what he wants to do with himself so he follows Nick Fury’s orders, because he has given up.  
But also I think that even though Steve doesn’t really want to be the sort of person who follows orders, he to a certain extent wants to want it, sort of as the equivalent of a very bright girl who plays dumb in class because she’s been told no one likes smart girls.  The good soldier is very much the model of ideal masculine success that Steve would have grown up with but wouldn’t have ever been able to achieve   
Which is ironic given that the ideal male icon most of the cast of the Avengers probably grew up with… is Captain America.

The thing I get from this scene is that Steve DOES crave to serve and take orders in a way? Like he doesn’t want to be a drone and take orders/be obedient in the literal sense (or else he would have been happy just being in the USO and raising money, or being a regular GI) he’s got a strong rebellious streak, natural snark, and unshakeable morals…but how I read Steve’s character is that he’s desperate for a cause, but it has to be something full of glorious purpose and heroism.  Not for Steve, collecting scrap metal or hocking war bonds for “the cause.”He wants to be pointed in the right direction and then just fucking RUN with it.  “Highly experimental super-serum? LET ME AT IT.”If you’ve ever read Middlemarch? Steve reminds me a lot of Dorothea: eager to throw their all into something, really yearning to sacrifice everything for the greater good, and their longing to be a hero comes out of goodness and love, but they do fall victim to pride and haughtiness because he gets impatient when things aren’t big and important—- They think that if a cause was righteous enough that they would love to dedicate themselves thanklessly to it and work uncomplainingly towards that goal.  But they’re too headstrong and spirited to actually just take orders and work for someone else when it comes down to that: the reality is different than they expect, and they become disillusioned but no less idealistic and passionate and their thirst for glory is just as strong as their thirst to do good in the world.So idk if this even makes that much sense, but I’ve thought about this a lot actually haha—for me, Steve’s main motivation isn’t trying to fill a masculine soldier role that doesn’t fit him(although his conception of soldier=hero is def a cultural/gender role type thing) ….but more that he WAS happy and fulfilled for a brief moment with the Howling Commandos (and with the Avengers once he’d gotten behind the mission) because he had a definite cause and definite orders that he could follow—- and now he feels adrift.  So his line to Natasha about how he “likes to know who he’s fighting” is related to this: he’s a smart guy, he understands grey, but he likes black and white.  In his mind, especially (as you point out) because of his depression and loneliness, he does want, above all, to take orders, just so things make some kind of sense again…
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"Don’t stop until you’re satisfied. You want an explanation? Ask. You want to be successful? Work. Don’t settle for results you don’t want. Don’t stop until you’re satisfied."
(the best advice a teacher has ever given me)
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memeguy-com:

Someone added this to the periodic table in their chemistry book
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boopbunny:

North is so beautiful
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robocvnt:

WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THIS?
robocvnt:

WHO IS RESPONSIBLE FOR THIS?
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